February 21, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
The Year 2019 presented numerous challenges to farmers and grazers, and consumers. Among them were significant flooding, dust storms, cyanobacteria (algal) blooms, prevent planting, glyphosate residue issues, and fake meats. Any one of these challenges is a serious enough issue to deal with, but all of these have occurred within the same year.
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February 12, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
Farming and food production have become hot-button issues today and can be a very confusing subject for consumers to sort out. Farming practices and food production have been linked to a number of things that consumers are concerned about including climate change, harmful runoff, animal welfare, food safety, drought and flooding, greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural chemicals, and many other concerns.
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February 6, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
We farm in southeast Colorado, in the state’s semi-arid, 15-inch rainfall area. The elevation is around 4,500 feet and our relative humidity is dry most of the time. Typical dryland crop rotations include wheat, grain sorghum, summer fallow. Corn is also grown on dryland along with various other crops including sunflowers, feed, with a few acres planted to oats, triticale, and millet in some years.
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February 5, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
There is a lot of talk going around rural America about paying farmers and ranchers to sequester carbon. Given the current low commodity prices, more money flowing to rural America would be welcome. But, what is that carbon really worth? We decided to do the math.
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November 29, 2019 • 0 comment(s)
You cannot pick up a farm magazine, listen to a farm radio program, or talk to an agri-business spokesperson without hearing the words “regenerative agriculture.” But what is regenerative agriculture and why is it creating such interest?
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September 9, 2019 • 0 comment(s)
July 29, 2019 • 0 comment(s)
In the first half of the 1900's Oktibbeha County, Mississippi had more than 800 small dairy farms. The large number of dairy farms earned the county the nickname of “Little Wisconsin.” These farms were using smaller breeds, like the Jersey and Guernsey, and the herds were primarily grazing.
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November 15, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
Once in every few generations someone comes along who defies all conventions and turns things on their ear. To do this, it takes a truly unique person who does not care what their neighbors think or what the world thinks. Instead, they doggedly pursue what they believe to be right. Such a person passed away from this world just a few weeks ago. That person was Neil Dennis from Saskatchewan, Canada.
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August 15, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
By: Allen R Williams, Ph.D. Without even realizing it, for well over than a century, American farmers have had the idea that nature is a beast to be tamed and contained. If we want to be good farmers and ranchers we must conquer nature and overcome her. We have invented many mechanical and chemical tools to help us in this fight.
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August 13, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
By Paul Brown It wasn’t too long ago that February and March were our busiest and most stressful months on the ranch. Like most other ranchers in the area, it was calving season for us. For years we calved during this time of year because it was “normal.” The argument is that the calves would be bigger in the fall once they were weaned and sold on the commodity market. Although this argument is true, it comes with detrimental costs in the form of stress, increased death loss, lack of sleep, and very hard work.
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August 13, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
By Dr. Allen R Williams, Ph.D. My consulting partners and I teach a form of grazing that we call Adaptive Grazing. Adaptive grazing, also called Flex Grazing, is first and foremost not a rigid system or even a routine. It allows the practitioner to address multiple goals and objectives, and to adjust to changing conditions. The benefits derived from adaptive grazing far exceed those of any other grazing practice I have experienced. The practice of adaptive grazing can be summarized in three basic principles that we employ.
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August 7, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
By Allen R Williams, Ph.D What is the Principle of Diversity? It is quite simple. In my experience in working with several thousand farmers and ranchers across a wide variety of environments and landscapes, I have found that plant species complexity and diversity are critical to building positive compounding and cascading benefits. In that regard, I have concluded that all pastures or rangeland need to have the three primary plant classes represented. These include grasses, legumes, and forbs (broadleaves). Additionally, it is desirable to have a number of species of each of the three primary plant classes. Not just one grass present, or one legume, or one forb. Rather, I strive to have at least three or more of each plant class present insignificant quantities in each pasture.
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